Tag Archives: grandiosity

Distorted Self Appraisal and Narcissism

Distorted self appraisal is a cardinal feature of narcissism. But grandiosity isn’t always a compensation for underlying feelings of low self-worth.

Egos Out of Control Always Destroy

We need our egos to navigate an often hostile, unloving world. And we need ego to mediate our baser instincts, too. But an ego too full of itself is always a problem, a destroyer of relationships, and often, of societies, too.

The Narcissistic Malignancy Spectrum

Narcissistic malignancy is largely about empathy deficiency and grandiosity. Folks who don’t care and feel superior will wantonly use and abuse.

Do Narcissists Really Believe They’re Always Right?

Behaving Like You’re Always Right Most true narcissists act like they’re always right. And sometimes they can be really convincing about it. They can project a remarkably confident image. Their demeanor seems to make a statement: “I don’t just think I’m right. I know I’m right.” But do they really believe such nonsense? Most folks … Continue reading Do Narcissists Really Believe They’re Always Right?

Narcissistic Insult Can Prompt Rage

Narcissists refuse to recognize or subordinate themselves to any higher power or authority. They see themselves as above the need. Besides, in their own minds, they’re always right. Reality sometimes clashes with that distorted self-perception. And that can prompt a narcissist’s rage.

Egomaniacal Characters

Egomaniacal characters are grandiose narcissists. And their grandiosity sometimes borders on the delusional.

Narcissistic Insults and Narcissistic Rage

Narcissistic insults stem from clashes with reality. Reality sends the message: “You’re not as great or powerful as you think you are.” But grandiose characters don’t take such challenges lying down. They see them as both and affront and an insult. And that’s typically when they unleash their rage.

Delusional Grandiosity and Narcissism

These days we have all kinds of ways to explain people’s dysfunction. And while there are indeed times when a perfectly healthy person’s biochemistry suddenly and for no apparent reason goes kaflooey, and cases where unpredictable tragedy so traumatizes that it temporarily impairs even the most well-adjusted person, more often, a person’s character not only predisposes the problems they experience in life but also exacerbates those problems when they occur.